Sector News

Tetra Pak plans closure of only Swiss plant

November 4, 2015
Chemical Value Chain

Packaging giant Tetra Pak is planning to close its only production plant in Switzerland next year, which would result in the loss of 123 jobs.

The company announced on Tuesday a plan to close the plant in Romont in the canton of Fribourg by September 2016.

The plant, operating for around 30 years, is to be put up for sale under the plan.

Employees were informed of the decision on Tuesday morning.

However, Tetra Pak said that no definitive decision would be made on the plant closure until January after a consultation process with employees.

If the plan goes ahead, the company plans to transfer the production capacity to its other sites in Europe .

Tetra Pak said it hoped through this measure to improve the efficiency of its operations, reduce costs and strengthen its competitiveness.

The Romont plant is profitable “but we can be more competitive by concentrating our activities in other sites,” Eric Schmid, Tetra Pak’s vice-president of commercial management, told Swiss TV broadcaster RTS.

A union official expressed surprise at the announcement, which came without warning, saying that the plant should be allowed to continue to operate, RTS reported.

Founded in Sweden and privately owned by the Swedish Rausing family through a Swiss holding company, Tetra Pak has grown into a multinational company headquartered in Pully, near Lausanne in the canton of Vaud.

Most of its production is outside Switzerland and the company has retained its research and development operations in Lund, Sweden.

Globally, the company employs more than 23,000 people and generates annual revenues of around €11 billion.

For more news from Switzerland, join us on Facebook and Twitter.

Source: The Local

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?