Sector News

South Korea’s Hanwha, SPC to develop biodegradable plastic material

June 19, 2021
Chemical Value Chain

South Korean firms Hanwha Compound and SPC Pack plan to jointly develop eco-friendly biodegradable plastic materials based on poly lactic acid (PLA).

The end-product should easily decompose in soil and will be used as packaging material for SPC’s products, Hanwha Compound said on Friday.

Financial details of the project were not disclosed.

SPC Pack is a packaging material manufacturing subsidiary of SPC Group – a Korean conglomerate engaged in food and confectionery business, owning some 40 brands, including Paris Baguette and Baskin Robbins Korea.

Since the start of the year, Hanwha Compound and SPC have been conducting research based on PLA, a biodgradable plastic made by fermenting starch extracted from corn and sugar cane, it said.

“While maintaining the advantages of PLA, which has excellent processability and rapidly decomposes, Hanwha Compound’s blending technology was applied to compensate for the disadvantage of being easily broken compared to general plastics. In particular, the material developed this time decomposes within a few years in the soil,” Hanwha Compound said.

Hanwha Compound is a 100% subsidiary of Hanwha Solutions, which was formed in January 2020 with the merger of Hanwha Chemical, Hanwha Q CELLS, and Hanwha Advanced Materials.

by Pearl Bantillo

Source: icis.com

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?