Sector News

Solvay divests its Italian site of Bussi

August 2, 2016
Chemical Value Chain

Solvay has agreed to divest its chlorine and peroxide derivatives site in Italy to Italian chemical company Caffaro, but will continue to market its EURECO™ organic peroxides, produced on the site, through an exclusive distribution agreement.

The planned divestment of the site of Bussi sul Tirino follows Solvay’s exit from its Western European chloro-alkali activities. Caffaro as a producer of basic and fine chemicals aims to further develop the site, which is mainly dedicated to chlorine and its derivatives. Through its industrial project, Caffaro will ensure sustainability of the plant by proceeding on a series of investments at Bussi site, as well as creating synergies with its current portfolio of activities.

Under the agreement, Caffaro will take over Solvay’s production of EURECO™ and further develop the product’s technology supported by the teams on-site. Solvay’s Peroxides Global Business Unit will continue to market and develop EURECO™ as its exclusive distributor in all countries except Italy and thereby ensure the long term partnerships with key customers.

Solvay’s EURECO™ is widely used in consumer and professional laundry markets for its effectiveness in removing stubborn stains, bleaching in compact product formulations, getting rid of malodour and in killing germs, bacteria and fungi on textiles and hard surfaces.

Source: Solvay

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