Sector News

Sika acquires US manufacturer of structural expansion joints

December 21, 2017
Chemical Value Chain

Sika has acquired Emseal Joint Systems, Ltd., a US-based market leader in the development and manufacturing of structural expansion joint products for new construction and refurbishment. With the acquisition, Sika will be able to offer the most comprehensive range of sealing and bonding solutions available in the North American construction market. Emseal generates annual sales of CHF 40 million.

Based near Boston, Emseal is a well-established US company with a strong brand and a leading position with construction specifiers and contractors throughout North America. Emseal is a technology-driven company, with a reputation for high-quality products, excellent customer service and innovative solutions for structural expansion joint applications in buildings, stadiums, parking garages and infrastructure facilities. The acquisition perfectly complements Sika’s range of sealing and bonding products and offers extensive cross-selling opportunities for other Sika technologies. With manufacturing in Toronto, Canada, and Westborough, Massachusetts, Emseal is well-positioned geographically to supply the North American market.

Christoph Ganz, Regional Manager North America: “The acquisition of Emseal fits perfectly with our growth strategy in North America, enabling Sika to reach new contractor customers and better penetrate key projects. We see significant synergies coming from the combined technologies and product ranges of Sika and Emseal. We are proud to welcome the successful team from Emseal into the Sika family and we are excited about growing our business together.”

Source: SIKA

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?