Sector News

Sika acquires FRC Industries

September 1, 2016
Chemical Value Chain

Sika has announced its acquisition of FRC Industries, a fibre manufacturer based in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

The company offers a full line of high quality synthetic polypropylene and steel fibres for concrete. Through this acquisition, Sika will be able to accelerate growth in the USA and further establish itself as a comprehensive supplier of solutions for the construction industry.

The concrete fibres of FRC Industries and the concrete colour additives of L.M. Scofield, a company acquired earlier this year, perfectly fit into Sika’s full range of concrete admixtures and allow Sika USA to offer a comprehensive portfolio of concrete additives. The expanded product offering will enable Sika to reach new customers and better penetrate key projects.

Christoph Ganz, Regional Manager North America: “The acquisition of FRC Industries is a welcome addition to our business and will support the continued growth in line with our Strategy 2018. We are proud to welcome FRC’s employees into the Sika team and we are excited about growing our businesses together.”

Source: World Cement

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