Sector News

Shell announces Executive Committee and Board change

March 5, 2022
Chemical Value Chain

Shell plc (“Shell”) today announced the appointment of Sinead Gorman as chief financial officer (CFO), effective April 1, 2022. She will become a member of both Shell’s Executive Committee and Board of Directors. After a distinguished career of 17 years with Shell, the last five years as CFO, Jessica Uhl will step down from her role on March 31, 2022. Jessica will be available to assist Sinead and the Board with transition until June 30, 2022, after which she will leave the group.

Shell’s Chair, Sir Andrew Mackenzie said: “I am delighted to welcome Sinead to the leadership of our company She combines broad finance, trading, new business development and capital projects experience with a deep knowledge of Shell, and a strong commercial and external focus. I look forward to working with her in the execution of our strategy to accelerate Shell’s transition to a net-zero emissions energy business purposefully and profitably.”

Sinead is currently Executive Vice President, Finance in Shell’s global Upstream business. She started her career as a civil engineer before embarking on a finance career when she joined Shell in 1999. Since then, she has held several increasingly senior finance roles in all Shell’s major businesses, in Europe, North America and latterly globally. A British national, she will be based in London.

Jessica was a key architect of recent strategic changes, including the simplification of the company’s share structure and the relocation of the corporate headquarters, along with the roles of chief executive officer and chief financial officer, from The Netherlands to the UK. However, due to family circumstances a long-term relocation to the UK is not sustainable, and therefore she will step down from her role.

Sir Andrew Mackenzie said: “The Board is immensely grateful to Jessica for her tremendous contribution to the company over many years, but particularly as CFO and especially during the past two years as we successfully tackled the many challenges presented by the pandemic. She has been instrumental in strengthening Shell’s financial position, putting in place measures to secure the company’s long-term health while delivering industry leading cash flows year on year. Jessica has been an exemplary ambassador for Shell and the company’s strength today is testament to her professionalism, resolve and values-driven leadership”.

Jessica Uhl said: “It has been an immense privilege to contribute to Shell’s leadership as we sought to reposition Shell for the future. Our forward thinking on the energy transition and firm commitment to reflect our principles and values in all we do made each day meaningful. I look forward to seeing what Shell achieves, knowing that the company is in very good hands.”

By Shell, Press Release

Source: shell.com

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?