Sector News

SBM to purchase Bayer’s Pasadena, Texas production facility

January 9, 2017
Chemical Value Chain

Following its Oct. 5, 2016 acquisition of Bayer Garden and Bayer Advanced consumer businesses, SBM has entered into an agreement to acquire Bayer’s Pasadena, Texas production operations.

The Pasadena site activities focus on formulation, filling and packaging of consumer use pesticide products. The site hosts multiple liquid and dust filling production lines.

“This agreement, as a logical continuation of our October 5th transaction, fits perfectly into our corporate strategy,” said Alexandre Simmler, Global CEO of SBM.

“This will give us the agility and capacity required to meet our aggressive growth ambitions for the U.S. market,” added Jim Van Handel, President of SBM, N.A. “It marks another strategic step in our North American expansion plans.”

The projected sale of the site to SBM is expected to close in late 2017.

Source: SBM

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