Sector News

Kemira acquires Soto Industries, LLC of Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

September 2, 2015
Chemical Value Chain

Kemira has acquired certain assets of Soto Industries, LLC, a privately owned company, headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Soto specializes in the application of scale control products, defoamers, and settling agents for the pulp and paper industry. Kemira is a leading chemicals supplier serving the global pulp and paper industry.

“The Soto Industries, LLC acquisition is another example of Kemira’s dedication to the pulp and paper industry as well as Kemira’s commitment to execute our global growth strategy via continued investment into our Paper segment,” says Billy Ford, Senior Vice President, Paper segment, Americas.

The transaction does not have material impact on Kemira’s financial figures and the parties have agreed not to disclose the transaction price.

Source: Kemira

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