Sector News

Israel Chemicals appoints Johanan Locker as chairman

April 22, 2016
Chemical Value Chain

Israel Chemicals has appointed Johanan Locker as chairman of the board to succeed Nir Gilad. Locker will take up his appointment on September 1.

Locker, 57, has held various command positions in the Israel Air Force (IAF), among them Chief of Staff and Deputy IAF Commander, from 2008 to 2010, and Head of the IAF’s Air Division from 2005 to 2008. He holds a MA in Public Administration from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, and a BA in Economics and Business Administration (with honors) from Bar Ilan University. He served as Military Secretary to the Prime Minister of the State of Israel from 2010 to 2012.

Locker is currently CEO of Clal Heavy Industries Ltd. chairman of the board of Beit Shemesh Engines, Golf & Co. Group and Clal Sun and a member of the board of Mashav Initiating and Development, Taavura Holdings and Jafora-Tabori. He was Hadera Paper chairman from 2013 to 2015.

Israel Chemicals said, “ICL’s Board of Directors views Johanan Locker as an experienced manager with proven decision-making capabilities and the skill-set required to analyze complex situations and lead strategies in a complex organization with broad operations facing multiple and diverse challenges.”

“The Board believes that Mr. Locker will make an important and significant contribution to ICL and wishes him much success. He will benefit from the undivided and deep cooperation of ICL’s CEO, Stefan Borgas, as well as all of the company’s management in their mutual efforts to meet ICL’s strategic goals and business objectives.”

Last month Israel Chemicals chairman Nir Gilad announced he was stepping down after eight years of service to parent company Israel Corporation in which he earned an average of NIS 20 million annually.

Source: Globes

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