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Dow Chemical Names Paula Tolliver CIO

September 19, 2014
Chemical Value Chain
Dow Chemical Co. has named Paula Tolliver CIO and corporate vice president of business services. She replaces David Kepler, who announced his retirement last week after nearly 40 years with the company.
 
Ms. Tolliver will report to James Fitterling, Dow’s newly named vice chairman for business operations. Her transition into the new role begins immediately, and the change will be effective Oct. 1. She will “drive Dow’s strategic vision for leveraging IT and analytics in innovative ways to deliver competitive advantage,” the company said in a statement.
 
Ms. Tolliver joined Dow in 1986 and held positions at various units including Dow AgroSciences, the Europe Information Systems group and Dow Purchasing, where she oversaw buying operations and managed more than $24 billion in global spending. In 2011, she became Dow’s corporate vice president of business services and information systems.
 
She has a Bachelor’s degree in business information systems and computer science from Ohio University and attended the executive education program at Babson College.
 
Dow shook up a number of its executive staff last week. Along with Mr. Fitterling’s new position, the company also named a new chief financial officer and chief commercial officer. The chemical conglomerate faces pressure from activist investor Dan Loeb over its results. Mr. Loeb has criticized the firm’s management over margins and a “poor operational track record,” notes the WSJ’s Michael Calia.
 
By Steven Norton
 

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