Sector News

Clariant to invest in new additives facilities in China

May 17, 2017
Chemical Value Chain

Clariant plans a multi-million Swiss-franc investment by its Additives business to ensure local manufacturing in China of customized, high-end solutions for the plastics, coatings and inks industries.

“This investment is another proof point of our commitment to strengthen Clariant’s position in China, where the future of our company is going to be decided. Local production in China puts us in a better position to benefit from the growth perspectives of the Asia region, and especially of China. Being closer to our customers enables us to better cooperate and tailor our solutions to their needs as well as gain valuable market insights,” says Christian Kohlpaintner, Clariant’s Executive Committee Member.

With this investment, Business Unit (BU) Additives adds its first two, fully-owned production facilities to the company’s long-standing regional network of commercial and technical support. This provides BU Additives increased ability to respond to the strongly growing demand for innovative and sustainable solutions in Asia. For example, the water-based coatings market in Asia Pacific region is estimated to grow from $15 billion in 2015 to $19 billion by 20201.

The expansion of its manufacturing footprint will also enable Clariant to shorten supply lead times and deliver customized high-tech solutions more rapidly in this region. The new facilities at Clariant’s well-established site in Zhenjiang, China, are expected to come on stream in 2018.

The two production units will focus on offering performance additive solutions for packaging, agro-films, automotive and other applications, and micronized waxes for various coatings and inks applications. These innovative and sustainable solutions can improve end product properties, extend energy conservation or have higher recyclability. They will fill unmet needs of new products with stronger sustainable characteristics and improved performance for customers in Asia, especially in China. According to China’s 13th Five Year Plan and the industrial policy ‘Made in China 2025’, the demand for environmentally compatible and safe products is highly emphasized.

Stephan Lynen, head of Clariant BU Additives, comments: “Clariant’s BU Additives faces strong demand from its customers in China and across Asia for sustainable value enhancement in the plastics, coatings and inks industries. With our new local manufacturing facilities we improve the proximity to our customer needs, accelerate our response time and enlarge our offering for high-end solutions. Bringing these technologies to the growth markets in Asia is the logical next step.”

The new Clariant Additives facilities in Zhenjiang are expected to come on stream in 2018.

By Gerald Ondrey

Source: Chemical Engineering

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?