Sector News

Carlyle agrees to buy 30 percent stake in Spain’s Cepsa: FT

April 8, 2019
Chemical Value Chain

Private equity firm Carlyle Group LP has agreed to buy a 30 percent stake in Spanish oil and gas company Cepsa from an Abu Dhabi sovereign wealth fund in a $3.6 billion deal including debt, the Financial Times reported on Sunday, citing people with knowledge of the transaction.

The sale gives the business a total enterprise value of $12 billion, roughly the same price tag that Cepsa’s owner Abu Dhabi wealth fund Mubadala Investment Company sought ahead of a failed attempt at a stock market listing last year, the FT said.

Carlyle will have at least two board seats, and Musabbeh Al Kaabi, a senior executive at Mubadala, will remain as chairman, the newspaper said, citing sources.

As part of the agreement, Carlyle reserves the right to buy up to 40 percent of Cepsa, which is one of the largest privately-owned oil companies in Europe and has been under Mubadala ownership for the last three decades, the FT said.

Carlyle, Cepsa and Mubadala could not be immediately reached for a comment.

By Rama Venkat

Source: Reuters

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