Sector News

Borealis signed on to the Global Plastic Action Partnership

January 31, 2021
Chemical Value Chain

Five leading organizations from the civil society and private sectors have joined the Global Plastic Action Partnership (GPAP), the World Economic Forum’s platform for advancing progress in the fight against plastic waste and pollution, as well as transitioning governments, businesses and society towards a sustainable, circular economy for plastics.

Created by a public-private coalition of global leaders and housed at the World Economic Forum since late 2018, GPAP aims to shape a more sustainable and inclusive world through the eradication of plastic pollution. It has launched three national partnerships with the Governments of Indonesia, Ghana, and Viet Nam, supporting local stakeholders in the effort to meet ambitious national plastic pollution targets, such as of reducing marine plastic debris by 70% by 2025.

“At Borealis, we are convinced that through collaboration in a circular economy we can successfully address the complex issue of marine littering,” explained Alfred Stern, Borealis CEO. “By engaging strategic partners from across the value chain, we are expanding Project STOP in Indonesia as a lighthouse initiative to design, implement and scale circular solutions that prevent the leakage of waste into the environment. Life demands progress. GPAP is an ideal collaboration platform for translating commitments into action, where together, we can re-invent for more sustainable living.”

These five organizations will work closely with GPAP at the global and local levels to contribute expertise and resources in areas such as unlocking financing, boosting innovation and promoting inclusivity. In joining GPAP, they have committed to sharing learnings and best practices; making pledges to reduce plastic pollution; actively participating in global and regional meetings; and leading circular plastics initiatives within their organizations.

by Borealis, Press Release

Source: borealisgroup.com

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?