Sector News

Azelis hires Al Pearce to join leadership team in the Americas

January 8, 2018
Chemical Value Chain

Azelis announced that Al Pearce has joined Azelis in Americas on Jan. 2, 2018 in the role of Group Principal Manager (GPM), reporting to Frank Bergonzi, Azelis CEO and President, Americas.

As Group Principal Manager, Al will interface domestically and globally with strategic suppliers and coordinate activities internally with Azelis colleagues from EMEA and APAC.

Frank Bergonzi states, “This is a milestone for Azelis and Al is a great addition to our team. This newly created position adds a key component to our business model. We are fortunate to have Al join us, as he brings a tremendous amount of experience and knowledge in specialty chemicals”.

Al earned a Bachelors of Science in Chemistry-Biology from West Chester University and MBA-Marketing from Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. He and his wife Sue, are parents to 3 young children. They reside in Bucks County, PA.

Source: Azelis

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