Sector News

Andreas Müller named new CFO of GF

March 24, 2016
Chemical Value Chain

GF announces today that effective 1 January 2017, Andreas Müller will become Chief Financial Officer of GF. He will succeed Roland Abt who has been CFO of the corporation for the last 13 years.

Andreas Müller (45), German citizen, has a vast experience in Finance and Controlling, M&A, Risk Management, IT and Strategy. He has been working for GF since 1995. Andreas Müller studied economics at the Hochschule Konstanz (D) and started his career as product manager at GF Piping Systems in 1995. He worked as Head Finance and Operations in Australia as well as in various operational positions within the division GF Piping Systems. Over the last eight years, he served as CFO of GF Automotive. The incoming months will allow Andreas Müller to become acquainted with his new tasks as well as to participate to the mid-year closing.

As announced earlier, the current CFO Roland Abt will step down at year-end after a long and very successful career at GF. He will remain with the company until the end of March 2017 in order to support the new CFO in the year-end closing of 2016.

Source: Georg Fischer

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