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AkzoNobel and Itaconix agree to co-produce bio-based polymers

January 31, 2017
Chemical Value Chain

AkzoNobel has signed a cooperation agreement with speciality chemicals company Itaconix for production of polymers from renewable ingredients.

The deal is in line with AkzoNobel’s commitment to fostering innovation.

Under the agreed terms, Itaconix will provide a proprietary polymerisation technology to convert itaconic acid, obtained from sugars through fermentation, into polymers.

AkzoNobel will take responsibility for the development and commercialisation of the bio-based polymers.

AkzoNobel Specialty Chemicals business RD&I director Peter Nieuwenhuizen said: “This innovation enables the production of polymers from renewable ingredients, which fits closely with our Planet Possible sustainability agenda of doing more with less.

“These bio-based polymers offer unique properties in applications essential to our everyday lives, ranging from water quality to cleaning and hygiene.”

Itaconix is a US subsidiary of Revolymer, which has partnered with AkzoNobel on a marine coatings project.

Revolymer CEO Kevin Matthews said: “AkzoNobel has worldwide capabilities to utilise our itaconic acid polymers in many application areas. We believe this agreement is an important step for the further development of bio-based chemistry on a large-scale.”

Earlier this month, AkzoNobel launched a chemicals startup challenge, called Imagine Chemistry, to find new opportunities for innovation and sustainable growth.

In addition, AkzoNobel recently completed the expansion of its production facility in Los Reyes, Mexico.

The new facility will produce Laurox brand organic peroxides, essential ingredients that are used in production of plastics and rubber products.

Source: Chemicals Technology

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