Sector News

Air Liquide enters the Norwegian biogas market

August 31, 2017
Chemical Value Chain

Air Liquide has announced its acquisition of a majority equity in Norwegian company Skagerak Naturgass AS, a subsidiary of Skagerak Energi that belongs to Europe’s largest generator of renewable energy, Statkraft.

Skagerak Naturgass AS operates a distribution network delivering natural gas to industry, and 100 percent biomethane to the Norwegian transport sector through four bio-natural gas for vehicle (bio-NGV) stations installed in the Oslo region. This new joint venture allows Air Liquide to pursue its business development in the Scandinavian biogas market, firmly aligned with its aim of harnessing renewables technology for clean transport.

Scandinavia and Norway in particular constitute one of Europe’s key markets in the development of sustainable mobility. The Government has declared targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and is committed to phasing out fossil fuel-powered vehicles altogether by 2030.

In 2014, Air Liquide purchased FordonsGas, a Swedish biogas distribution company that owns and operates a network of 50 compressed biogas (CBG) stations providing customers with fuel from one of the world’s largest biogas liquefaction facilities, which chiefly produces CBG for the Swedish transportation market.

Like hydrogen, biogas contributes to address today’s energy and environmental challenges by offering an alternative to fossil fuels. Air Liquide is present across the value chain of both these renewables, from production through storage and distribution, to the development of applications that serve their end users.

Source: Air Liquide

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?