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Why Gen-Z talent is more likely to pursue entrepreneurship

August 23, 2018
Borderless Future

Entrepreneurship is a word that is hip and trendy nowadays due to the glossy displays of success from the several big companies who have made it and have also defined it our life experiences.

But entrepreneurship is not only more prevalent due to the reception of the lure of the success that those companies brought with them, but also due to the fact, the large tech conglomerates have redefined access to resources, people, ideas, and experiences.

The Gen-Z population, which is making its first debut in the workforce, is a generation that has, for the majority of their lives, been around computers, smartphones and various other gadgets. Their learning has been defined by the openness and vastness of the internet, as well as various digital educational tools in the classroom. It is a generation, that more so than the other generations in the workplace, has been accustomed to learning and communicating through technology. Due to the fact that technology is so malleable, in a sense that creates the opportunity for customized experiences, people who are a part of the Gen-Z generation, stepping away from the more traditional and defined roles. As a matter of fact, a study done by Universum Global, which surveyed 50,000 students in the Gen-Z group, found that 36% of Gen-Zers fear that they will be stuck in careers that do not allow them development opportunities. Many Gen Z-ers have a preference for starting their own business or doing contract work. In other words, they do not want to be defined or limited.

Another interesting finding about the G-Z population is that more than half, 56% to be exact, would consider joining a workforce instead of going to college. What this means is that more and more Gen-Zers do not see college as a necessary ingredient for success. As a matter of fact, since they have learned through digital technologies, rather than traditional learning such as classroom learning of the past decades, they have the confidence they can learn from non-traditional sources and succeed. Of course, the rising college debt is also a factor as to why many are actively weighing the pros and cons of college education and the investment that comes with it.

Thus, putting all these factors together, it seems like due to the environmental factors and the upbringing of Gen-Z, many of are comfortable with non-traditional roles, that do not have confined boundaries. This search for a more malleable career path where they are not defined is expressed as an interest for this group lends itself well to entrepreneurship. Of course, this goes hand-in-hand with the ‘gig economy’ that has been created.

Dr. Anna Powers is an entrepreneur, advisor and an award winning scientist. Her passion is sharing the beauty of science and encouraging women to enter STEM fields.

Source: Forbes

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