Sector News

It’s time to stop talking about millennials

October 29, 2018
Borderless Future

A few weeks ago, a middle-aged friend joked to some office colleagues that he found millennials frustrating to handle — “until you have to convert a PDF file into a word document”.

An actual millennial — normally defined as someone born between the early 1980s and 1996 — was furious. “I could do without the ageist jokes,” she wrote in an email. “In 10 years, [people] will see this as the equivalent as saying everyone hates blacks — until they need a basketball player.”

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

By Gillian Tett

Source: Financial Times

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