Sector News

For patients to trust medical AI, they need to understand it

September 5, 2021
Borderless Future

Artificial intelligence-enabled health applications for diagnostic care are becoming widely available to consumers; some can even be accessed via smartphones. Google, for instance, recently announced its entry into this market with an AI-based tool that helps people identify skin, hair, and nail conditions. A major barrier to the adoption of these technologies, however, is that consumers tend to trust medical AI less than human health care providers. They believe that medical AI fails to cater to their unique needs and performs worse than comparable human providers, and they feel that they cannot hold AI accountable for mistakes in the same way they could a human.

This resistance to AI in the medical domain poses a challenge to policymakers who wish to improve health care and to companies selling innovative health services. Our research provides insights that could be used to overcome this resistance.

In a paper recently published in Nature Human Behaviour, we show that consumer adoption of medical AI has as much to do with their negative perceptions of AI care providers as with their unrealistically positive views of human care providers. Consumers are reluctant to rely on AI care providers because they do not believe they understand or objectively understand how AI makes medical decisions; they view its decision-making as a black box. Consumers are also reluctant to utilize medical AI because they erroneously believe they better understand how humans make medical decisions. READ MORE

by Chiara Longoni, Romain Cadario, and Carey K. Morewedge

Source: hbr.org

comments closed

Related News

September 12, 2021

This giant wind turbine blade can be recycled

Borderless Future

Wind turbines generate electricity without using fossil fuels or producing particulate matter pollution, but they do create waste. Though they can last as long as 25 years, turbine blades cannot be recycled, piling up in landfills at the end of their life. Siemens Gamesa’s RecyclableBlade can be broken down into its raw materials at the end of its life.

August 29, 2021

How data literate is your company?

Borderless Future

Evidence suggests that most companies are still struggling to build data literacy, even after they’ve identified it as critically important: just a quarter of employees report feeling confident in their data skills. Here are five strategies to help companies improve.

August 22, 2021

Why do Chief Data Officers have such short tenures?

Borderless Future

The Chief Data Officer is arguably one of the most important roles at a company. It’s also a position that has become notoriously hard to stay in. The average tenure of CDOs is just two to two-and-a-half years. There are a few reasons for this.

Send this to a friend