Sector News

Big brands turn to big data to rekindle growth

August 27, 2019
Borderless Future

Most foodies and wellness junkies have probably sampled kombucha, eaten jackfruit and tried CBD oil in the past few years as these once obscure products infiltrate the mainstream. But the truly hip will soon move on to sipping on pea milk, taking gaba supplements, and smearing their faces with bakuchiol.

Those are predictions from Black Swan, a London-based start-up that hoovers up data from social media, online forums, product review websites as well as other sources and then analyses it to divine what consumers want. Its artificial intelligence software purports to sift signal from noise to figure out which early trends are destined for mass adoption.

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

By Leila Abboud

Source: Financial Times

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