Sector News

12 companies innovating end-to-end traceability technology

October 10, 2021
Borderless Future

Last month, the FDA announced the 12 winners of it’s Low or No-Cost Tech-Enabled Traceability Challenge, which was part of the New Era for Smarter Food Safety initiative. The initiative aims at achieving end-to-end traceability throughout the supply chain, and the goal of the challenge was to develop creative low- to no-cost solutions that enable food companies of all sizes to achieve full traceability.

Here are the winners:

atma.io
External Link Disclaimer
atma.io is the result of a partnership between Avery Dennison and Mastercard Provenance that uses blockchain technology to provide item-level traceability from farm to fork.

FarmTabs
FarmTabs is a free open source tool to help small and mid-sized farmers manage traceability records by tracking data related to growing and shipping.

Freshly
Freshly is a batch-tracking and traceability tool for small retailers (both brick-and-mortar and ecommerce), manufacturers, and distributors.

HeavyConnect
HeavyConnect provides cloud-based digital compliance documentation for the food supply chain. Their traceability solution was designed for primary producers (i.e., the “first mile”).

Kezzler
Kezzler gives farms self-service portals where they can generate item-level identifiers and use smartphone apps to store data and retrieve product information on demand.

Mojix
Mojix is an open-item chain where individual items or lots are associated with unique identifiers that follow them throughout the food safety chain.

OpsSmart
OpsSmart is a food safety and traceability solution that makes data accessible via smartphone. All data are stored in the barcode or a QR code, providing complete traceability from the farmer to the consumer.

Precise
Precise’s traceability tools can be used by stakeholders of every size and at every step of the supply chain, including importers. The data can be automatically integrated into manufacturing systems.

Roambee / GSM / Wiliot
This solution uses low-cost IoT sensor tags that can collect and report a wide variety of data, including location, temperature, and humidity, to the cloud via Bluetooth.

Rfider
Rfider is a software-as-a-service (SaaS) platform that captures, secures, and shares data across the supply chain, all the way to consumers.

TagOne
TagOne provides traceability using a role-based data capture framework and an open source blockchain platform.

Wholechain
Wholechain uses blockchain technology along with Mastercard to provide end-to-end traceability and tell the story of every product.

By Krista Garver

Source: foodindustryexecutive.com

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