Sector News

What’s your best tip for navigating the first 90 days on the job?

January 14, 2015
Borderless Leadership
Starting a new job can feel like the first day of school all over again — except you can’t count on any quarterly report cards to tell you where you stand.
 
So how should a newbie navigate these bewildering first months?
 
When Influencer Angela Ahrendts started anew as the senior vice president of Apple Retail, she shared this poignant advice after about two months on the job: “[T]rust your instincts and emotions. Let them guide you in every situation; they will not fail you. Never will your objectivity be as clear or your instincts sharper than in the first 30-90 days. Cherish this time and fight the urge to overthink.”
 
We delve deeper into this critical time in our latest series on LinkedIn, My First 90 Days, as Influencers from Richard Branson to Deepak Chopra reveal how they survived their first three months on the job.
 
Given that the average worker will stay at his job for less than 5 years (according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics), there will be plenty of first days to experience.
 
YOUR TURN: What do you wish you had known when you were starting a new job? What could have made your first few months as a new hire more successful?
 
Whether you’re starting a new job or simply recalling your own first days, check out some of these tips — and then add your own by publishing a post on LinkedIn. Please use the hashtag #First90 somewhere in the body (not the headline) of your post.
 
Here’s what the Influencers had to say:
 
Listen, and write everything down.
 
Not many professionals will experience 400 first days, so take it from someone who has — Richard Branson.
 
Amid the blur of new faces to remember and information to digest, staying organized is key. Even a brilliant mind like Branson finds value in jotting things down: “Whether it’s in an old-fashioned notebook like I favour, or on your iPhone, record what you learn and add your own observations too. You’ll soon have a priceless resource to build upon.”
 
If it works for Branson…
 
> Read the full article on LinkedIn
 
By Amy Chen
 
Source: LinkedIn

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