Sector News

Leaders aren't born — they're made

October 1, 2015
Borderless Leadership

Some of the leaders I admire include Vince Lombardi, Reggie White, Steve Jobs, Howard Schultz, Peter Drucker and Martin Luther King. Others include Oprah Winfrey, Margaret Thatcher and my mother.

These individuals had courage, vision and followers. They were decisive on the one hand and had humanity on the other.

These people had the ability to influence others, get important things accomplished and make a difference.

With the challenges facing our country and communities, we need leaders at all levels: family, community, business, organizations and religious institutions.

Leadership and management are related but different. Managers maintain order and work within a budget. Leaders advance a vision or direction, challenge the status quo, and promote innovation and risk taking to find a better state. Their focus is effectiveness rather than efficiency.

Leadership is the art of influence and getting people to follow you. Leaders rely on knowledge and integrity which is trust. This requires self-confidence, a sense of purpose, and communication skills. In business, leaders help people and organizations to see and realize their potential.

Leadership can be learned and leadership skills can be developed. We are not born leaders and leadership is not in our DNA.

Essential leadership elements include vision, vitality, proactivity, decisiveness and humanity. Each element can be further broken down for understanding — needed knowledge, skills and experiences.

From a knowledge perspective, there are programs and resources available. Many articles have been written on the subject. The military has some of the best materials and training programs. I would also encourage reading biographies of successful leaders.

From a skills perspective, most are “soft skills” and include communication, relationship, self-awareness (emotional intelligence), problem solving, teamwork and teaching. Others include writing, public speaking and salesmanship.

Experience and practice are essential to leadership development. This experience can come from sports, project or program lead responsibility, career positions, community service, coaching, teaching and team involvement.

Practice and self-study are very important. I spent years working to improve my communication and public speaking skills.

We should encourage our youth to aspire to leadership roles and positions. We should encourage our organizations and businesses to teach leadership and provide leadership opportunities for development.

By Robert Keller

Source: postcrescent.com

comments closed

Related News

November 28, 2021

Becoming a more humane leader

Borderless Leadership

Most of us think we have to make a difficult, binary choice between being a good person or being a tough, effective leader. This is a false dichotomy. In truth, doing hard things is often the most human thing to do. There are two key ingredients — wisdom and compassion — and it takes learning and practice to lead with both, as well as some unlearning of conventional management habits.

November 21, 2021

How much ‘radical transparency’ in a workplace is too much?

Borderless Leadership

A lack of transparency has been a workplace problem for years. Not only are workers happier in transparent workplaces, but they may also be more likely to stay in their jobs; research shows when communication is poor, many workers are more likely to consider leaving their positions.

November 14, 2021

Top signs of a toxic workplace and how to deal with it

Borderless Leadership

“Toxic” has become an increasingly popular term to describe anything that could be psychologically unhealthy for us or encourage negative patterns. Unfortunately, this word is particularly applicable to the workplace. If business owners and managers aren’t careful, the organization and work culture they worked hard to build could spiral into the kinds of conditions that make their employees dread turning up to work every day.

Send this to a friend