Sector News

How to start a new executive job

September 25, 2014
Borderless Leadership

By MiShaun Taylor, eHow Contributor

Starting a new executive job is exciting and can be a bit nerve wracking as well. You’ve done the work and gotten the job. The next part is to live up to the expectations your superiors have of you and ensure that things are going the way they’re supposed to go. Below, you’ll learn how to start a new executive job.

Instructions

1. Research the company you’ll be working with. Prepare in advance by learning as much as you can about your new employer. You’ve probably already done a great deal of research in order to interview, however, it’s important to understand in detail the company’s practices, mission and target market, to name a few. To start your research, visit the company website if you haven’t done so already. Check for top co-workers on social networking sites like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. Read any literature you’ve been given about the job and the company. This will prepare you for starting your new executive job.

2. Consider your position. Think about what you will bring to your position as well as what you hope to gain from that position. As the new boss of your subordinates and the new subordinate of your bosses, you need to be able to answer these questions when they arise. Considering your position will also help you set attainable goals that you can follow through on. What do you hope to accomplish? What do you want to change, if anything? How would you like to improve on the company’s image? Make a list and write down your answers to really learn and consider what your role in the company will be.

3. Keep your ears open. When you start your new executive job, it’s important to keep your ears open and, for the most part, your mouth shut. Only discuss the job and the benefits you are bringing to the job. All personal conversation should wait until you get to know your co-workers better. However, it’s important to listen to what’s going on within the company so you will be up to date and educated about the company. Find out who the eyes and ears of the company are.

4. Establish productive relationships. Work on establishing positive, professional relationships with your boss and the individuals who will report to you. Things will go much more smoothly if you have a laid-back but professional relationship with everyone. They should feel comfortable coming to you and vice versa.

5. Open lines of communication. Communication is the key to being successful in your new job, much like in personal relationships. Develop open lines of communication with both your bosses and the individuals who will report to you. Let them know that you’re available when needed without being pushy or intrusive. Become someone your co-workers can trust and rely on and you will quickly find that they will become that person for you as well.

By using the information above, you can get off to the best possible start at your new executive job.

Source: E HOW

Related News

April 17, 2021

The surprising power of peer coaching

Borderless Leadership

The benefits of small-group coaching come from powerful learning interactions among leaders who aren’t on the same team but are roughly equal in experience and position, and the process can generate leadership development impacts that exceed what’s possible in one-on-one coaching.

April 10, 2021

The pandemic is changing employee benefits

Borderless Leadership

A new report on the future of benefits shows that 98% of human resource leaders and C-suite decision-makers from across the U.S. plan to newly offer or expand at least one benefit due to lessons learned during this crisis.

March 27, 2021

9 Keys to Delegating Successfully

Borderless Leadership

Smart entrepreneurs learn quickly that they can’t do everything on their own. Learn how to delegate more effectively with these tips.

Send this to a friend